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Favourite Images

Sometimes there’s no need to go into detail.

This page just contains some images that I particularly like.

Jupiter’s moon Io

Credit: Galileo Project, JPL, NASA

On the left of the image, a sulpherous bluish eruption is visible about 140 kilometers above the surface of a volcanic caldera on Jupiter’s volcanic moon Io. 

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Enceladus Looms.   Credit: Cassini Imaging Team, ISS, JPL, ESA, NASA

 A sunlit crescent of Saturn’s moon Enceladus looms above the night side of Saturn in this dramatic image from the Cassini spacecraft.

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Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

A “Rose” Made of Galaxies to highlight Hubble’s 21st Anniversary

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Credit: D. López and R. Barrena (IAC)

Wider view of Cat’s Eye Nebula (thanks @RainDogJones)

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Credits: Raghvendra Sahai and John Trauger (JPL), the WFPC2 science team, and NASA

Planetary Nebula MyCn18: An Hourglass Pattern Around a Dying Star

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Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team

NGC 6302 (The Bug Nebula)

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]Credit: NASA, Andrew Fruchter and the ERO Team [Sylvia Baggett (STScI), Richard Hook (ST-ECF), Zoltan Levay (STScI)

The Eskimo Nebula

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Cats Eye Nebula. Credit: NASA, ESA, HEIC, and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) Acknowledgment: R. Corradi (Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes, Spain) and Z. Tsvetanov (NASA).

The Cat’s Eye Nebula

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Credit: NASA, ESA, STScI, J. Hester and P. Scowen (Arizona State University)

Gas Pillars in the Eagle Nebula (M16)

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The Cassini spacecraft looks past the cratered south polar area of Saturn's moon Rhea to spy the moon Dione and the planet's rings in the distance.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

The Cassini spacecraft looks past the cratered south polar area

of Saturn’s moon Rhea to spy the moon Dione and the planet’s

rings in the distance.

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